a rant; get over it

​​you can find me at: @K_AnnM | Insta | LinkedIn

Excuse me. Two very simple words. Two tiny words that can change your demeanor in a matter of seconds. Let’s take a look at this two word phrase. Excuse me, is an expression that asks for forgiveness for a social violation, such as bumping into someone or asking someone to move to the side so you can move around them with ease. No more, no less. Excuse me is a simple phrase used throughout daily life, or so I thought.

I don’t know if manners aren’t being taught anymore but often I find myself in daily situations on my commute, in the grocery store, walking home, visiting a tourist location, etc., where it is evident that people don’t know what the phrase “excuse me” means. Even worse, in every situation there is a wide age range of people who are totally brain-dead when this small phrase is uttered.

Without a doubt my mind is blown by the pure lack of response when I say “excuse me” in a crowd of people on the metro, museum, at the office, a restaurant or even on the street. Lately, it has irked me more than usual because it’s a manners issue, it’s a parenting issue. Now, as you all know I am not a parent so really I have no “right” to be saying what comes next, but I’m going to say it so take all of the offense you want; I don’t care. I don’t care anymore because apparently parents are not doing their “jobs” anymore and teaching simple courtesies of the world to their children who in-turn will be ruling the world in the coming generations. [Gawd, if​ I read this I’d think this was written by the most crotchety old person of all time who hated everything and everyone].

Maybe my Midwest upbringing made me nicer than the normal person. Maybe my kickass parents taught me more than the average parent. Maybe I notice (more than the average Millennial) that kids are running rampant around without control because kids freak me out. Maybe the fact that the phrase “excuse me” is common anymore should be. Call me old school, but let’s bring these tiny two words back into our normal repertoire. I’m lobbying for this phrase to be common until the day I die.

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discipline

alleluia

you can find me at: @K_AnnM | Insta | LinkedIn

Happy Easter! Easter Sunday marks the end of Lent. After 40 days, the discipline and contemplation is over. The wait is over…and I finally devoured some cheese.

Often, during the Lenten season, we give up something — or refrain from doing something, such as consuming meat — but whatever it is, it is supposed to act as a reminder of the hardship Christ endured because of their faith.

At the beginning of the Lenten season, I wrote a blog about Lent and what the season means. You can either read it here, or see the brief synopsis:

 As you can see, Lent is about sacrifice and discipline.  Look at any successful person, the ones who have excelled in their fields, do so because of passion, endurance, and discipline. While each may exhibit unique styles and individual elements, their success ultimately runs parallel to their dedication to the defining disciplines of their field. Discipline, not individual freedom of choice, brings out the most success.

Today is about praise and discipline. As a Wisconsinite, it was a challenge to give up cheese for the 40 days of Lent. Now that the season has ended, I celebrated with cheese  I thank my lucky stars for discipline.

Make today a celebration and however you celebrate, make sure you smile.

Interview questions

they’re not just for the perspective employer

you can find me at: @K_AnnM | Insta | LinkedIn

With interviews, there always come questions. Questions are asked by the potential employer. They are trying to figure out whether this job is the right fit for you, which will lead to very important questions. Questions from any caliber are fair game at this point. Go into the interview prepared to answer some questions, but you also need to be prepared to ask questions. Think to yourself, what do you want to know about the position, the company, the department and the team?

To get you thinking, here is a list of key questions to ask in your interview. Definitely don’t ask all of them rapid-fire—some of this stuff will be covered during the course of your discussion, and you can weave in other questions as you go. When the inevitable, “Do you have any questions for us?” part of the interview comes, you will be prepared to answer that daunting question? Here’s a few suggestions to make sure you’ve covered all your bases.

1. Tell me a little about your office culture.

2. What’s your favorite part about working here?

3. How has the company changed since you’ve been here?

4. Does the company offer philanthropic opportunities?

5. Please explain a typical day for this role.

6. How do you measure success?

7. Tell me about the team I would be working with and how they function.

8. What would make a person successful in this role?

9. What challenges will I face in the first three months of this role?

10. Why is the last person who held this position leaving?

This last one is a no-brainier, make sure to follow up. Ask a simple question like, “What are the next steps in the interview process?”

Remember: Don’t ask about salary or benefits just yet. Wait until you are in the final steps of the interview process to negotiate with the hiring manager or an HR representative.

honesty

it’s the best policy

you can find me at: @K_AnnM | Insta | LinkedIn

An idiom that everyone has heard is “honesty is the best policy.” FreeDictionary.com explains what this idiom actually entails:

Honesty is the best policy. Prov. You should always tell the truth, even when it seems as if it would be useful to tell a lie. Jill: I borrowed Jane’s white blouse without asking her, and then I spilled tomato sauce on it. Should I tell her what happened, or should I just put the blouse back in her closet and hope she won’t notice? Jane: Honesty is the best policy.

Since a young age, I have been taught that it is always best to be honest in everything that you do and the truth will set you free.

To play a little devil’s advocate, the reality is, we don’t need weapons to mortally wound those closest to us. Words (honesty) cut like knives and they make it easy to bury your relationship because of the verbal cuts of a “truthful” tongue.

“Honesty is the best policy” was given to me as a blog post suggestion, and after a little research on debate.org, it appears that honesty might not be the best policy. This little idiom is getting a lot of heat, but in return many people are sticking up for honesty. For me, I look at it like this lately, we see things around us which are not honest. Dishonesty is something we are in a constant battle with. Sure, dishonesty will help some shine, but the luster can only last for a short time. Honesty is courageous and bold while dishonesty is a cowardly and bleak. How can a honest person not come out as shining star? A dishonest person will always lose the battle in the end, and a honest person will win a place in the hearts of people. With all of this said, isn’t honesty is the best policy?

Just be honest and everything else will come in place. Do you agree that honesty is the best policy? If you don’t I would love to hear your thoughts on what the best policy is.

what are your top three?

 you can find me at: @K_AnnM | Insta | LinkedIn

“We need to remember what’s important in life: friends, waffles, work. Or waffles, friends, work. Doesn’t matter, but work is third.” ― Leslie Knope

SO to Diego for sending me this quote. I just needed to pass this along because I have a Leslie mentality. To me, work is always third. In fact, I think for most of us, work falls into third place. So what ranks at your one and two?

defeated

sometimes we feel a little defeated

you can find me at: @K_AnnM | Insta | LinkedIn

Yesterday, I posted a blog about rejection. If you want to read the whole post, click here. To sum up the last post, rejections push us to our dreams and goals. Sure, rejection sucks and we feel defected but that doesn’t mean we are, it just means that wasn’t out opportunity and that’s not our path. A friend sent me this HuffPost article titled: What To Do When You’re Feeling Defeated. He suggested that it would be a great addition to omg it’s kendal ann, and I couldn’t agree more. After reading the HuffPost article, it really fits in with the theme of rejection and how you need to get over that hump and move on. Like Amy Shearn says, “If things are going catastrophically awry, you are allowed to wallow, of course you are — but for exactly four minutes. Here’s what to start during minute five…” read her article for what to do next.

wake up

to a sunrise

you can find me at: @K_AnnM | Insta | LinkedIn

If I can offer you one tip for advice when it comes to being a morning person, read the following, wake up with the rising sun. There is something magical about seeing the sun rise. The sun rising is the dawn of a new day and it symbolizes a new beginning and youth. Try to take on a new beginning with the sunrise, you won’t regret it.

This morning, I watched the sunrise in Miami and it was a beautiful sight. My sunrise, fortunately, was a view of the skyline. Tomorrow, I will be out on the beach reining in a new day with the sun.

Truthfully, I know it sounds corny, but wake up when the sun is rising. Try it, just once. It will turn you into a morning person but there are perks to come like seeing the city come to life, having more hours to do things in a day and just taking a minute to enjoy the calmness.

success

you can find me at: @K_AnnM | Insta | LinkedIn

Sometimes, Sam Davidson is in my head. This man and I are on the same wavelength more often than not. If you don’t know who Sam is, I would suggest getting to know him through his blog. Below is a post from today about success and what it gets you.  After reading Sam’s post, it’s impossible not to take into consideration the benefits and ramifications of success. Is success really want you want?

What Success Gets You

I’ve found that more than anything else, success gets you noticed.

More people email or call. People listen. Folks perk up.

Success may get you other things, too. Or maybe it leaves out stuff.

So if you want attention, be successful. They go hand in hand.

But if you really want something else, there may be another path to it.

networking

here are some tips, that actually work

you can find me at: @K_AnnM | Insta | LinkedIn

With networking you have to go from awkward to awesome. I don’t know anyone who actually likes networking, but it’s something we all need to do. Here are a few tips and tricks when it comes to networking. Here are a few networking tips from Entrepreneur and a few more, too.

1. Be on time, better yet arrive early-  Showing up early at a networking event is a much better strategy than getting there on the later side. As a first attendee, you’ll notice that it’s calmer and quieter – and people won’t have settled into groups yet. It’s easier to find other people who don’t have conversation partners yet.

2. Ask easy questions. Don’t wait around the edges of the room, waiting for someone to approach you. To get the conversation started, simply walk up to a person or a group, and say, “May I join you” or “What brings you to this event?” Don’t forget to listen intently to their replies. If you’re not a natural extrovert, you’re probably a very good listener – and listening can be an excellent way to get to know a person.

3. Ditch the sales pitch. Remember, networking is all about relationship building. Keep your exchange fun, light and informal – you don’t need to do the hard sell within minutes of meeting a person. The idea is to get the conversation started. People are more apt to do business with – or partner with – people whose company they enjoy.

If a potential customer does ask you about your product or service, be ready with an easy description of your company. Before the event, create a mental list of recent accomplishments, such as a new client you’ve landed or project you’ve completed. That way, you can easily pull an item off that list and into the conversation.

4. Share your passion. Win people over with your enthusiasm for your product or service. Leave a lasting impression by telling a story about why you were inspired to create your company. Talking about what you enjoy is often contagious, too. When you get other people to share their passion, it creates a memorable two-way conversation.

5. Smile. It’s a simple – but often overlooked – rule of engagement. By smiling, you’ll put your nervous self at ease, and you’ll also come across as warm and inviting to others. Remember to smile before you enter the room, or before you start your next conversation. And if you’re really dreading the event? Check the negative attitude at the door.

6. Don’t hijack the conversation. Some people who dislike networking may overcompensate by commandeering the discussion. Don’t forget: The most successful networkers (think of those you’ve met) are good at making other people feel special. Look people in the eye, repeat their name, listen to what they have to say, and suggest topics that are easy to discuss. Be a conversationalist, not a talker.

7. Remember to follow up. It’s often said that networking is where the conversation begins, not ends. If you’ve had a great exchange, ask your conversation partner the best way to stay in touch. Some people like email or phone; others prefer social networks like LinkedIn. Get in touch within 48 hours of the event to show you’re interested and available, and reference something you discussed, so your contact remembers you.