wait, that’s not your name?

you can find me at: @K_AnnM | Insta | LinkedIn

You guessed it, we’re talking about names and getting it correct. This seems to be a boiling point with me. Back in 2013, I dedicated a whole post about spelling my name wrong, and apparently it’s time for a refresher.

I know, I know, it’s like beating a dead horse, but maybe when that faithful day when people finally get it right, I won’t have to bitch anymore, but until then I will give you a crash course. When it comes to my name, no, I don’t have much faith in people, so let’s get on with it.

My name is Kendal Ann, that’s spelled K-e-n-d-a-l with one L and an Ann.

I don’t understand why this is  such a hard concept for people to grasp. My name is not a different variation such as,  Kendall, Kendel, Kendell and my name most certainly is not Kendra. My name is Kendal Ann, and maybe Kendal if that’s how I introduced myself to you.

The issue, of my name is something that I am venting to David about on a weekly bias. Yes, it bothers me. It bothers me so much because this has been going on my entire life. News flash, I like my name. I like my name a lot. You know what, I even  love my name. I  wish people, would call me the right thing; it’s my name. Does it really take that much effort to get my or anyone else’s name right?  I go through all of the trouble (please note that is sarcastic because it’s not trouble at all) to get your name right, so do the same for me. Have some respect. If I introduce myself as Kendal Ann, I expect you to refer to me as that unless I say something else. Maybe that’s rude, but I don’t go around calling my friends who introduce themselves as Michael, Mike, unless they note otherwise.

Earlier this week, I had an email exchange with someone I don’t know about my name.  Keep in mind, I’ve been a part of this organization for seven years. I just received an award form this organization. These people know who I am. I emailed this woman blanking stating my request and adding in, “Additionally, is there anywhere in the database you can note that my preferred name is Kendal Ann, not Kendal?” This woman emails me back a few days later saying: Hi Kendal! …

So, I am sure you can see it. That is the final straw that broke the camel’ s back. I wrote back and at the very end I noted:
Additionally, please note the name preference.
-Kendal Ann
(It’s Kendal with one L and an Ann)

From here on out, this is how I will be signing my name to people who don’t get it right on the first try. Of course it made me feel bad, but I am sick of standing back ideally especially when people don’t have the common decency to spell Kendal right. Hey, bro, look at my email, my signature, the sign off. You have three opportunity to edit before hitting the send button.

David tells me, he’s never seen someone so worked up about this, but when you have a name that isn’t your basic Nicole, Emily, Sarah then what do you expect? And you know, I am beyond happy I have a unique name, I just want people to show a little respect and refer to me as my proper name. It’s really not that hard. Maybe Kendal Ann seems too formal to these folks, but formal or not it’s my name and it’s what I prefer to be called. After all, it’s not like I am asking you something totally absurd and out of the question. I am just asking you to slow down and spell my name correctly and to keep on the Ann, stop dropping it off.

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spelling

can’t we just use spell check?

you can find me at: @K_AnnM | Insta | LinkedIn

My name is Kendal Ann and I am a terrible spelling. Welp, looks like the cat’s out of the bag on that one.

The correct spelling of words is important, even in this day and age of computer spell checks. It’s much more important than many people realize. You might think correctly spelling words isn’t  that important any more, but poor spelling could actually seriously affect your prospects and career. let’s use a real life situation for an example, an employer has two candidates for a job, one resumé is full of mistakes, the other is spotless. The two candidates may have equal qualifications, but the employer will always gain a better impression from the one who has carefully checked their spelling.

When you write something, it leaves an impression on those who read it. If you make spelling errors, that impression will not be a positive one. It’s essential that work documents and college work have impeccable spelling, or you could end up losing out.

It is understandable that someone might have trouble spelling if they are dyslexic or not a native speaker of English. However, everyone else should make an effort to ensure that they spell correctly. It’s not that difficult to make sure that whatever you write is correct – running it through the spell checker takes very little time. Do you think that spelling matters, or do you feel that language needs to move with the times and adapt its spelling accordingly?

cover letters

Cover letters are an integral part of the job application. Cover letters can both be annoying and rewarding. As any job seeker knows, a cover letter is a must when applying to a job. Below, Matt shares a guest post about cover letters and how they are a vital part when applying for a job. Matt will share with you a few tips and tricks he’s learned to get his application noticed.

you can find me at: @K_AnnM | Insta | LinkedIn

an application’s basic necessity

guest blog presented by: Matthew D. Shalbrack
You can find Matt on Twitter: @hamsterjockey; insta: hamsterjockey, make sure you follow him!

As most know, I’ve been on the job hunt for five months now. I’ve put out hundreds of applications and cover letters to various abbreviated non-profits, sports teams, newspapers and electronic stores. Minus the food industry, you name it and there’s a great shot I’ve tried to apply or applied for a position with them.

One thing that I’ve noticed is an interesting factor to the job hunt is the elusive cover letter. Cover letters have become such a vital part with applying for jobs nowadays, that some employers don’t even need to list it as a part of the application process anymore – it’s just a basic necessity, like oxygen or sports. Yes, sports are a basic necessity in my mind, but that’s a blog post for another day.

Anyways, with the various jobs that I’ve applied for, I’ve tried some different versions of my cover letter in order to see which works best. There’s the general one where you just need to change the name of the position and the company, there’s the witty one that shows shades of your personality and then there’s the combination of the two.

I started off using the general cover letter but then I realized that it was pretty basic and that every job I applied for had different qualifications that I needed to list in the cover letter. Then, I used the witty one, which I decided, works for specific jobs, but not for all of them. Finally, I’ve been using the combination of both lately and it’s very enjoyable. I haven’t had any success with any of them – a few interviews here and there, but nothing that has led to a job. However, with the witty one, I did get an email back from the employer quickly asking for more writing samples and complimenting me on how well written and clever it was. Although I didn’t get that position, I’ll chalk it up as a victory for the home team.

Through my months of writing cover letters, I have a few suggestions for writing a great cover letter.

  1. Start it off with something unordinary, meaning, don’t write, “I am writing in regards to the job position yadda yadda yadda.” As an employer, I’m sure they get millions of cover letters that start out like that. In order to get recognized, you need to be different, so BE different right off the bat and come up with a great opening line that will keep the employer interested and intrigued right away.
  2. DON’T HAVE ANY SPELLING OR GRAMMAR MISTAKES!!! One of the biggest things that I am an advocate of is making sure that all words are spelled correctly and that there aren’t any misplaced commas or improper usages of semicolons. You’ll just look silly and immediately be dismissed from contention (most of the time). Which leads me into my next one –
  3. PROOFREAD PROOFREAD PROOFREAD! Reread your cover letter and make sure that you’re not missing words. Even if you use spellcheck, some common words will be passed over even if they’re spelled wrong because you missed a letter. If you have someone you trust, have them proofread your cover letter after you write it. Another way is to make the font size big; I’m talking like 48 point big and then proofread it. Since the font is so big, it’ll make it so there are only a few words on each line and it will force you to read it a lot slower which will help pick up those mistakes that could have been made.
  4. Tailor your cover letter to the position you’re applying for. If you have experience in social media and the position calls for social media, make sure you highlight that. If the position doesn’t call for social media, you can touch on it, but make sure that you focus the various aspects of the job description.

Those are some of the main tips I have for writing cover letters. I’ve had my cover letter proofed and edited by a few professors and friends, so what I have is definitely a beneficial piece that I can add to my resume. However, the toughest part is actually getting a call back and that’s something that I have yet to master the art of.

Any cover letter tips or suggestions? If so, drop them in a comment. I’d love to hear what other advice you have for us job seekers!